Detailed instructions for 9 simple steps to help you learn to swim backstroke!

Backstroke breathing technique

Detailed instructions for 9 simple steps to help you learn to swim backstroke!

Backstroke is one of the four swimming styles used in competition defined by FINA (International Swimming Federation). And it is the only one of these swimming styles that does not sink the face and head into the water. This style of swimming has the advantage of being easy to breathe, but the downside is that swimmers cannot see where they are swimming.

In today’s post, we will guide you to learn swimming backstroke with 9 simple steps.

Step 1: Keep your body flat like a plank

When you do the supine motion, your body will lie as flat on the water as possible. The smaller your area in the water, the less resistance you will feel and the easier it is to move.

Keep your body flat like a plank

Keep your body flat like a plank

Most people will find it difficult for the hips to float above the water. So their hips will sink a little under the water. This is fine, but try to keep your hips as close to the water as possible. It will make it easier for you to keep yourself upright as you move.

Step 2: Be comfortable with water covering the sides of your head

Backstroke swimming (like most swimming styles) will immerse part of your head in the water. Water will cover your ears almost completely. It can touch the corners of your face, but don’t let the water overflow, into your eyes, nose, or mouth.

Be comfortable with water covering the sides of your head

Be comfortable with water covering the sides of your head

If you don’t like the feeling of water on your ears, consider buying a swim cap or a set of swimmer’s earplugs. Trying to get your ears out of the water will strain your neck. This will consume energy that you could otherwise use to swim.

Step 3: Use a shake kick

As soon as you are in the supine position, start kicking your legs. Your legs should be straight, close together, and lined up below your hips. Use short kicks to push yourself forward. When you lift one leg up, kick the other leg down, kicking in an alternating up and down pattern. The big two toes tend to be intertwined.

Use a shake kick

Use a shake kick

For best results, straighten your legs and kick from your hips, not from your knees. This will give you a lot of strength and prevent you from sore knees when swimming backwards.

Step 4: Pay attention to the arm movement

When you start kicking forward, keep your arms at your sides. Raise one arm in front of you. It should be facing the sky or ceiling. Fan your hand over your head, shoulder, and then into the water – it will determine the direction you are swimming in.

Pay attention to the arm movement

Pay attention to the arm movement

When your arm hits the water, bring it down and swing it outwards to push yourself forward. When you do this, raise the other arm and perform the same movement. Try to keep your arms and legs steady as that will help you swim faster and easier.

Step 5: Your position minimizes the resistant

To swim back as efficiently as possible, it’s important to remember that your hands should get in and out of the water with the edges of the hands, not the palms. As you lift your arm out of the water, start with your thumb. And when the hand gets in the water, the little finger will touch the water first.

Your position minimizes the resistant

Your position minimizes the resistant

When your hands are under the water pulling you forward, let the palms face your feet. This will give you the push energy to go forward.

Step 6: Rotate your shoulder and hips with each kick

Your movement in the pool should not be as rigid as a steamboat. Instead, relax and be flexible in your body to move as efficiently as possible.

Rotate your shoulder and hips with each kick

Rotate your shoulder and hips with each kick

As you lift each arm, rotate your shoulders. Rotate the opposite shoulder down, you should use it to pull the other hand under the water.
Likewise, twist your hips slightly with each kick. You should have a slight “swing” movement. Your right hip will go down when your right foot kicks and vice versa.

Step 7: Inhale once per arm cycle

A good way is to inhale when one arm leaves the water, then exhale when the other hand leaves the water. Repeat the process with your deep breaths to keep your breath steady.

Inhale once per arm cycle

Inhale once per arm cycle

Breathing deeply and evenly is important although backstroke allows you to breathe whenever you want. Regular-rate breathing allows you to hold your back (with your body straight) for as long as possible.

Step 8: Flip turn technique

Flip is used for free swimming, backstroke and even kick sets. There are some core benefits of mastering this skill and below are the main reasons.
– It’s faster
– It is more effective
– It will help you build endurance

Flip turn technique

Flip turn technique

Knowing how to do a flip will ensure better workout because every time you pause, you give your body a little rest.

Step 9: If you swim indoors, look at the ceiling to keep yourself swimming straight

When you swim in an indoor pool, you can use the ceiling to keep your body moving straight. You can look for a line or similar on the ceiling. When you swim, try to keep your eyes open and focus on that line. It will help you swim in a straight line.

look at the ceiling to keep yourself swimming straight

look at the ceiling to keep yourself swimming straight

Above are 9 steps to guide you to swim backstroke. Wish you success!

Related:

5 basic swimming exercises that you need to do when learning to swim!

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